Yale Study Finds Twice as Many Illegal Aliens as Previously Estimated

Immigration is the focus of fierce political and policy debate in the United States. Among the most contentious issues is how the country should address undocumented immigrants.

At the center lies a fairly stable and largely unquestioned number: 11.3 million undocumented immigrants residing in the U.S. But a paper by three Yale-affiliated researchers suggests all the perceptions and arguments based on that number may have a faulty foundation; the actual population of undocumented immigrants residing in the country is much larger than that, perhaps twice as high, and has been underestimated for decades.

A new study, using mathematical modeling on a range of demographic and immigration operations data, suggests that the actual undocumented immigrant population may be more than 22 million.

My Drug Experiences As A Youth

The other day an old friend asked me a rhetorical question:

‘Why didn’t we have a drug problem when you and I were growing up?’

I replied that I did have a drug problem when I was young:

  • I was drug to church on Sunday mornings.
  • I was drug to church for weddings and funerals.
  • I was drug to family reunions and community socials no matter the weather.
  • I was drug by my ears when I was disrespectful to adults.
  • I was drug to the woodshed when I disobeyed my parents, told a lie, brought home a bad report card, did not speak with respect, spoke ill of the teacher or the priest, or if I didn’t put forth my best effort in everything I did.
  • I was drug to the kitchen sink to have my mouth washed out with soap if I uttered a profanity.
  • I was drug out to pull weeds in the garden and flower beds.
  • I was drug to the homes of neighbors to help mow the yard, repair the clothesline, and if my mother had ever known that I took a single dime as a tip for this kindness, my dad would have drug me back to the woodshed.

Those drug experiences s are still in my veins and they affect my behavior in everything I do, say, or think. They are stronger than cocaine, crack, or heroin, and if today’s children had that kind of drug problem, our country would be a better place.

Thumbs up to all the parents who drugged us during our youth and taught us right from wrong.